Final Menu Labeling Requirements Strongly Supported By Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 25, 2014

CHICAGO, IL – The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics strongly supports the Food and Drug Administration’s final menu labeling rules that will provide consumers with the information they need to make healthful decisions for themselves and their families.

This next step in the long-awaited implementation of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s national requirement for all restaurant-type chains of 20 or more establishments to clearly post the calorie information for each standard item on their menus or menu board. The final rule also adopts the Academy’s previously submitted comments to the FDA seeking a requirement for calorie counts of alcohol to be listed at restaurants.

The FDA’s menu labeling initiative has long been a strategic priority of the Academy. “We believe providing accurate, and tested information to a consumer educated in nutrition basics can have a powerful effect on food selection,” said Academy President Sonja L. Connor, MS, RDN, LD. “We strongly agree with the FDA’s decision to include calorie counts of alcohol in the final menu labeling requirements.”

In addition to restaurant chains, the final menu labeling requirements will also apply to restaurant-type establishments selling prepared foods for immediate consumption, such as movie theaters, bowling alleys, convenience stores and grocery stores and other establishments where Americans frequently eat.

For example, as grocery stores and supermarkets expand prepared foods offerings or eateries, shoppers who buy ready-to-eat foods from these locations may benefit from knowing the calorie content of their selections.
“Even savvy consumers can be confused about calorie counts,” said Connor. “This ruling could greatly impact the health of Americans, who consume about one-third of their total calories and spend half of their food budget eating away from home, whether at restaurants, grocery stores or entertainment venues.”

“Menu labeling is an important step forward in helping address our obesity epidemic,” Connor said. “These initiatives are supported by legitimate research, but to be truly effective must include nutrition education and policy evaluation, and ensure calorie counts are accurate. Context and education are critical to making menu labeling a meaningful tool for consumers.”


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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and Registered Dietitian Nutritionists Celebrate National School Lunch Week Through Nationwide School Nutrition Programs

FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 9, 2014

CHICAGO – As part of National School Lunch Week, October 13 to 19,
the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics celebrates the hard work and dedication of registered dietitian nutritionists who lead school lunch programs across the country to provide nutrition education and healthful meals to children.

“The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics believes that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve children’s the nutritional status, health and academic performance,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy President Sonja Connor.

“Some of the greatest resources we have to achieve this are the thousands of registered dietitian nutritionists who work in school meal and nutrition education programs. Their tireless dedication helps students not only eat healthier meals, but also better understand how to live a healthy lifestyle both in and out of school,” Connor said.

The Academy’s School Nutrition Services dietetic practice group has more than 1,200 members, working in school districts, federal and state agencies, business and industry, and colleges and universities, all dedicated to the integrity and promotion of school meal programs and the advancement of sound nutrition for children.

With the implementation of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, SNS members make sure students are exposed to and can learn about nutritious foods served as part of school meal programs. For example:

“We have a farm-to-school approach to nutrition education that links the classroom, dining center and school garden. A featured food of the month and locally procured items are highlighted on the menu, and schools can grow and harvest produce for the dining center. Classroom teachers are also integrating nutrition education into Common Core.” – Tarrah DeClemente, MPH, RDN, LDN, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, Ill.

“With the Pick a Better Snack program in Iowa, students are very willing to try new foods when presented in a fun learning environment. When kids learn about the foods they are trying, play games and see their classmates trying the fresh fruit and vegetable snacks, students usually do try the snack, and most often times like them.” – Abbie Scott, RD, LD, Jackson Elementary and Howe Elementary, Des Moines, Iowa.

“We collaborate with a local nonprofit to provide taste tests in elementary school cafeterias, as well in the classroom of two elementary schools in our county. The classroom nutrition education is part of the Fresh Fruits and Vegetable Program that provides funding for fresh produce as well as lesson plans.” – Mary Andreae MS, RD, LDN, Buncombe County Schools, Ashville NC

“These examples represent just a few of the thousands of amazing registered dietitian nutritionists whose goal is providing a healthful future for children,” Connor said.

The Academy supports the work of child nutrition specialists through public policy efforts, the Academy Foundation’s Kids Eat Right, program and numerous online resources focused on healthful eating at school.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.

Keep Food Safe and Cut Grocery Costs with Home Food Safety Tips In Support of National Food Safety Education Month

FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 3, 2014


CHICAGO – During National Food Safety Education Month in September, keep food safe and your grocery bill in check with food storage advice from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods’ public awareness campaign: HomeFood Safety.

“How you store food can keep it safe and fresh longer, reducing not only your risk of food poisoning, but also food waste and ultimately your grocery bill,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Marisa Moore.

Approximately 31 percent of all edible food is wasted in the U.S., and American households throw away about 19 percent of vegetables and 14 percent of the fruit they buy.

“A lot of good food goes bad before we get to enjoy it. So before you head to the store, shop in your refrigerator first,” Moore says. “Cook or eat what you already have at home before buying more, but make sure to check the label or shelf life to ensure it is okay to eat.”

Much food waste is due to improper storage and misreading labels, according to Moore, who offers tips to help foods last longer and reduce the amount of food wasted.

Proper Storage
“Use a refrigerator thermometer to ensure your refrigerator or freezer isn’t running a fever,” Moore says. Store perishable foods at or below 40°F in the refrigerator and at or below 0°F in the freezer.

Store produce properly to extend freshness. “Some fruits and vegetables should be stored in the refrigerator and others at room temperature, while some should not be stored together.” Check out this handy Produce Storage infographic to learn more.

Reading Labels
“You can also dramatically reduce food waste in your home by knowing what the date labeling terms on the package mean to avoid throwing out food that is still OK to eat,” she says. More than 90 percent of Americans may be prematurely tossing food because they misinterpret food labels according to Moore, who highlighted these key terms to look for:
·         The “sell by” date tells the store the last day they should sell that specific package. “Buy the product before the ‘sell by’ date passes and cook or freeze the product before it expires - check the time on the Keep It Cool Storage Chart or download the Is My Food Safe? app for a list of the shelf life of common foods.”
·         The “best if used by” date is the recommended date for best flavor or quality.
·         The “use by” date is the last date recommended for use of the product at peak quality. “Remember, you can’t always tell if food has gone bad by how it looks, smells or even tastes. So if a product has a ‘use by’ date, definitely follow that date,” Moore says.

Moore also adds that if the “use by” date is approaching, there is no need to force yourself to eat it all to avoid waste. Freeze surplus food, such as abundant seasonal produce or meats to extend its shelf life. “You can even get creative, such as freezing soon-to-expire yogurt in ice trays to later blend with fruit for a smoothie,” says Moore, who highlights this technique on The Cutting Board blog.

“While it’s important to reduce food waste for both the environment and our wallets, remember: When in doubt, throw it out!”

For more tips on safe food storage, read Produce from Purchase to Plate: Steps to Reduce Food Waste or see the infographic Read Food Labels to Reduce Food Waste.

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The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods’ Home Food Safety program is dedicated to raising consumer awareness about the seriousness of food poisoning and providing solutions for easily and safely handling food in their own kitchens. More information can be found at www.HomeFoodSafety.org

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.
 

New Study on Diabetes Risk Emphasizes Value of a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in Prevention and Treatment, Says Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

FOR RELEASE AUGUST 14, 2014

CHICAGO – A new study, indicating that Americans have approximately a 40 percent risk of developing diabetes during their lifetime, offers more evidence that nutrition counseling provided by a registered dietitian nutritionist can help prevent or delay diabetes and its related health problems through lifestyle and dietary changes, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

“Health professionals are in agreement that nutrition services are one of the first treatments individuals should receive to improve conditions such as diabetes and its related complications,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Angela Ginn.

The study, by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, says: “Continued increases in the incidence of diagnosed diabetes combined with declining mortality have led to an acceleration of lifetime risk and more years spent with diabetes, but fewer years lost to the disease for the average individual with diabetes. These findings mean that there will be a continued need for health services and extensive costs to manage the disease, and emphasize the need for effective interventions to reduce incidence.”

“Research has shown that weight loss through moderate diet changes and physical activity plays a significant role in preventing or delaying diabetes and its complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage and other health problems. A registered dietitian nutritionist is one of your best resources for developing a plan to make these lifestyle changes,” said Ginn, who is also a certified diabetes educator.

“For those who have been diagnosed with diabetes, an RDN can create an eating plan tailored just for you, taking into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle and other health problems you may have. The expert advice of an RDN can help you manage your diabetes while ensuring you get the nutrients your body needs.”

RDNs often work as part of a medical team, in many practice settings, such as hospitals, physician offices, private practice and other health care facilities, and medical nutrition therapy provided by an RDN is covered by numerous insurance plans including Medicare Part B.

“Check with your insurance plan for specific medical nutrition therapy coverage details. Your plan may cover nutrition counseling for chronic conditions and health concerns like diabetes and prediabetes. Together with a registered dietitian nutritionist, you can set nutrition goals to improve your health,” Ginn said.

“Ask your doctor if a referral for medical nutrition therapy provided by a registered dietitian nutritionist is right for you. With a physician's referral, you can make an appointment to see the RDN at your local hospital outpatient department, physician clinic or at an RDN’s practice near your home.”

For help developing a healthful eating plan that can help prevent the onset of diabetes, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist in your area.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy's Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use "registered dietitian nutritionist" (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world's largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org


As Children Head Back To School, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Encourages Parents To Fuel Kids Right With A Healthy Breakfast

FOR RELEASE AUGUST 12, 2014

CHICAGO – The back-to-school movement is in full swing. As parents scour stores for the year’s school supplies, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages them to stock up on healthy breakfast foods, too. August is Kids Eat Right Month, the perfect time to emphasize how a healthy breakfast is crucial in providing children the nutrients and energy they need to succeed in school.


“Studies show that breakfast eaters tend to have higher school attendance, less tardiness and fewer hunger-induced stomachaches in the morning, which means fewer trips to the school nurse,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Toby Smithson. “Their overall test scores are better, they concentrate better, solve problems more easily and have better muscle coordination. Children who eat breakfast are also less likely to be overweight and more likely to get enough calcium.”

But too often and for a variety of reasons, children do not eat this fundamental meal. The Academy’s FamilyNutrition and Physical Activity Report revealed that breakfast is not eaten all of the time by 42 percent of white and Hispanic children and 59 percent of black children. Additionally, 12 percent of white, 18 percent of black and 12 percent of Hispanic children reported never or rarely having breakfast.

“For most people, time is the biggest obstacle to eating in the morning, but a healthy meal doesn’t need to take a lot of time to prepare,” Smithson says. “Getting organized the night before, keeping meals simple and even taking breakfast to go are three easy steps parents can take to make sure breakfast is eaten every day.”

Smithson offers quick, easy and balanced breakfast ideas for children:
·         Cheese slices served on whole-grain toast
·         Iron-fortified, whole-grain cereal with low-fat milk and banana slices
·         Nut or sunflower butter spread on whole-grain toast or waffles or rolled inside a whole-wheat tortilla
·         Fruit like peaches, strawberries or raisins in instant oatmeal made with low-fat milk
·         Apple slices and low-fat yogurt topped with crumbled graham crackers
·         Lean turkey on a toasted whole-wheat English muffin

“These options are all loaded with protein and carbohydrates, two important nutrients that help energize the body and keep stomachs full for longer,” Smithson says.

“While some prepackaged foods may seem convenient, parents should be cautious, as many contain excess sugar and fat. Donuts, toaster pastries, pork bacon or sausage sandwiches, chips, fruit drinks and some cereals can be laden with extra calories and have little nutritional value. Read the nutrition label to find lower-fat items and the ingredients label for products that do not list sugar as one of the first ingredients,” Smithson says.

“Most importantly, parents need to be positive role models: Eat breakfast yourselves,” Smithson says. “If your children see you making excuses, they are likely to do the same. But if they see you making time to eat a healthy meal, they will follow your good example. Your whole family will be better off.”

Visit www.KidsEatRight.org for a library of healthy breakfast ideas and for more information about Kids Eat Right Month, including the Kids Eat Right Month press kit. For help developing a healthful eating plan that fits the needs and tastes of your family, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist in your area.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org


During Kids Eat Right Month and Every Day, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Says ‘Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act’ Creates Healthier Environment For Every Child

FOR RELEASE JULY 24, 2014
  
CHICAGO – From pregnancy to infancy through adolescence, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act is establishing strong nutrition policies for core federal child nutrition programs implemented through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. During Kids Eat Right Month in August, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics emphasizes the importance of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act to ensure the youngest, most vulnerable populations have access to the nutrition they need to thrive and to grow into healthy adults.

“Nutrition policy shapes our environment and is especially critical to children’s well-being,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy President Sonja L. Connor. “With the aim of improving children’s nutrition and decreasing childhood obesity and hunger, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act is a key contributor and a historic piece of legislation. By using evidence-based science to create nutrition policy, we are establishing a healthy environment for every child in America.”

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act affects the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC); the Child and Adult Care Food Program; the National School Lunch Program; the School Breakfast Program; and the Summer Food Service Program, among others. Through these programs and more, registered dietitian nutritionists across the country play an integral role in leading programs that improve children’s health.

“Time and time again, WIC has proven effective in safeguarding the health of pregnant women, infants and children up to age 5 who are at risk of being malnourished,” Connor said. “WIC touches one in every two kids born in the United States – it has an enormous impact on our nation.” 

By providing nutritious foods to supplement diets, nutrition education on healthy eating and referrals to health care, WIC improves birth outcomes and limits health care costs.

The Child and Adult Care Food Program promotes high-quality, affordable child care by helping providers serve nutritious meals and snacks. Research shows food at participating centers is nutritionally superior to non-participating facilities.

“By serving nutrient-dense foods to 3 million children every working day through the Child and Adult Care Food Program, we are able to help young children receive nutrition they need to grow and play,” Connor said.  

Once children enter school, they are welcomed by a healthy environment thanks to changes to school foods, according to Connor. From kindergarten through high school, the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program provide nutritious food in schools to help ensure students are exposed to fruits, vegetables, whole grain-rich foods, lean protein and low fat or no fat dairy. During the summertime students can also take advantage of the Summer Food Service Program, which aims to cover the hunger gap many students face when school is not in session.

“Whether it is in vending machines, during lunch or at a school fundraiser, kids will be surrounded by healthier, more nutritious options that support a balanced diet based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” Connor said. 

Thousands of registered dietitian nutritionists work with schools as Kids Eat Right campaign members and in celebration of Kids Eat Right Month to help improve the local health environment, making sure students get the most out of their day. Kids Eat Right is a joint initiative between the Academy and its Foundation, dedicated to providing science-based healthy eating workshops, classes, articles, recipes, videos and tips to help schools, parents and families shop smart, cook healthfully and eat right.

“Strong nutrition policy such as the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act and initiatives like Kids Eat Right are putting us on the path to becoming healthier. We are making an impact today and are setting the stage for tomorrow,” Connor said.

For more information about Kids Eat Right Month and healthful eating at school and beyond, visit www.KidsEatRight.org.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation is a 501(c)3 charity devoted exclusively to nutrition and dietetics. It funds scholarships and awards, public awareness and research projects and the Academy strategic initiatives, and is the largest provider of scholarships and awards in the field of dietetics. The Foundation’s mission is advancing public health and nutrition utilizing the expertise of registered dietitian nutritionists. Visit the Academy Foundation at www.eatright.org/foundation.


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

As Kids Head Back To School, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Says Students Should Expect Healthy Meals

FOR RELEASE JULY 22, 2014

CHICAGO – Significant improvements in school meals designed to improve the health of 32 million schoolchildren are taking place nationwide thanks to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, championed by the First Lady Michelle Obama and implemented through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. During Kids Eat Right Month this August, as children head back to the classroom, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says more school meal changes are in store.

“Parents can trust that when they send their kids to school, they will have access to healthy, nutritious food – more fruits and vegetables, whole grain-rich foods, and less salt, sugar and fat,” says registered dietitian and Academy Spokesperson Wesley Delbridge.

“Healthier meals help ensure kids are getting the nutrients they need to perform well in school and have energy to be active and participate in sports, and to also grow into healthy adults,” says Delbridge. “These changes can result in a lifetime of health benefits, including reduced risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.”

Based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the changes to school meals include:
·         More fruits and vegetables. Lunches offer more fruit and vegetables, and breakfast will increase the amount of fruit offered to students. “Fruits and vegetables are packed with nutrients and most are low in calories, making them a great option for growing kids,” Delbridge says.
·         Less fat. Schools now only offer low-fat or fat-free milk, which contain all of the nutrients with less fat than whole milk. Meals also include foods that are lower in saturated fat, such as skinless poultry, lean meat and heart-smart vegetables oils. In addition, trans fats is limited to zero grams per serving.
·         Whole grain-rich foods. All grain-based foods like breads and muffins will now be whole grain-rich, ensuring they contain at least half whole wheat or whole grains. “This is great news,” Delbridge says. “Whole grains take longer to digest, fueling kids throughout the school day.” Whole grains also contain important nutrients like B vitamins, selenium and magnesium.
·         Healthier sodium amounts. Over the next 10 years, schools will be required to slowly reduce sodium by 25 percent to 50 percent. “Prior to the recent changes, some school lunches contained more than 1,400 milligrams of sodium – that’s 60 percent of what most children should be eating all day.”

Many schools have implemented a Farm to School program, supporting their efforts to serve more fruits and vegetables. Currently, 44 percent of schools are bringing foods from local farms, with produce being the most frequently purchased.

Delbridge, who is the director of food and nutrition at Chandler Unified School District in Chandler, Ariz., says these programs are exposing children to new foods at his school that they enjoy.

“Research shows that eating behaviors are established early in life, so we’re really setting ourselves up for a healthier generation of Americans,” Delbridge says. “If we want to solve national concerns of obesity and overweight, especially for our children, we need to begin at school, but our work doesn’t end there.”

In August, Kids Eat Right Month, a joint initiative of the Academy and its Foundation, focuses on the importance of healthful eating and active lifestyles for children and families, featuring expert advice from registered dietitian nutritionists. “As Kids Eat Right campaign members, thousands of RDNs are teaching families how to shop smart, cook healthfully and eat right,” Delbridge says.

The Kids Eat Right initiative features an interactive website, www.KidsEatRight.org, providing science-based health and nutrition articles, recipes, videos and tips to help parents and families.

For more information about healthful eating at school and beyond and Kids Eat Right Month, visit www.KidsEatRight.org.

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The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation is a 501(c)3 charity devoted exclusively to nutrition and dietetics. It funds scholarships and awards, public awareness and research projects and the Academy strategic initiatives, and is the largest provider of scholarships and awards in the field of dietetics. The Foundation’s mission is advancing public health and nutrition utilizing the expertise of registered dietitian nutritionists. Visit the Academy Foundation at www.eatright.org/foundation.


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists Improve Children’s Health During Kids Eat Right Month and All Year


CHICAGO – The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation and its Kids Eat Right initiative empower more than 5,000 registered dietitian nutritionists to address childhood obesity and food insecurity, making an impact both locally and nationally through research and education.

Kids Eat Right was launched in 2010 to reduce childhood obesity trends. Thousands of campaign members—registered dietitian nutritionists—will take collective action nationwide in August in schools and communities to celebrate the first annual Kids Eat Right Month.

“Kids Eat Right campaign members are dedicated to using the science of food and nutrition to improve the health of children and families,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Foundation Chair Terri J. Raymond. “As the food and nutrition experts, RDNs have the knowledge and expertise to make a difference in the health of children, and the Academy Foundation is proud to support RDNs as we engage families, schools and communities on the local level, making a big impact nationwide.”

As the world’s largest charitable organization devoted exclusively to nutrition and dietetics, the Academy’s Foundation has awarded:
•         $150,000 in mini-grants to registered dietitian nutritionists to provide nutrition education to more than 50,000 kids and adults across the country
•         $297,000 in research grants to Academy members, including $35,000 for childhood obesity research through the Foundation’s Food and Nutrition Research Endowment
•         $1 million in Champions for Healthy Kids grants in 2014, providing nonprofit organizations working with registered dietitian nutritionists the resources they need to make an impact locally.

The Foundation has also supported programs in schools and community centers, targeting kids and parents as part of the RD Parent Empowerment program. An evaluation of the program found statistically significant improvements in parents adopting healthy behaviors for themselves and their families.

“Support at home for healthful eating and physical activity is key, but we also found that reaching kids at school is extremely effective, especially in low-income communities that are more heavily burdened by the obesity epidemic and the lack of resources for prevention and wellness,” Raymond says.

To make an impact in schools, the Foundation created Energy Balance for Kids with Play, an evidence-based program that promotes healthy school environments through nutrition, physical activity and energy balance knowledge and behavior changes in kids. Led by specially trained RDNs as school nutrition coaches, EB4K has engaged 170,000 elementary students in 90 schools within the past seven years.

“Through EB4K, we’ve seen tremendous success in increasing students’ nutrition knowledge and attitudes and creating a school environment that supports healthier behaviors,” Raymond says.

According to Raymond, in a two-year evaluation of the EB4K program in a school district in Richmond, California, students in third and fourth grade experienced a significant reduction in body mass index and participated in more moderate to vigorous physical activity than comparison schools. Lunch records also showed that the EB4K schools ordered more vegetables for their school lunch program than comparative schools.

Through Kids Eat Right, the Foundation also features the interactive www.KidsEatRight.org, providing science-based health and nutrition articles, recipes, videos and tips to help parents and families shop smart, cook healthy and eat right.

For more information about Kids Eat Right Month and the Kids Eat Right program, visit KidsEatRight.org.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation is a 501(c)3 charity devoted exclusively to nutrition and dietetics. It funds scholarships and awards, public awareness and research projects and the Academy strategic initiatives, and is the largest provider of scholarships and awards in the field of dietetics. The Foundation’s mission is advancing public health and nutrition utilizing the expertise of registered dietitian nutritionists. Visit the Academy Foundation at www.eatright.org/foundation.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.




During World Cup, Registered Dietitian Helps Fuel
U.S. Men’s National Team




FOR RELEASE JUNE 30, 2014

During World Cup, Registered Dietitian Helps Fuel 
U.S. Men’s National Team 

CHICAGO – With game day energy needs exceeding 3,400 calories for the average World Cup soccer player, it is essential for the U.S. Men’s National Team to have the proper diet to achieve success. Since 2012, registered dietitian and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics member Danielle LaFata has provided the team with the knowledge and resources they need to power their bodies through one of the most challenging endurance sports in the world.

“Since Jurgen Klinsmann became the head coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team, there has been an even greater emphasis on providing the appropriate sources of fuel and energy to achieve maximum success,” LaFata said. “By serving as a personal example and by bringing a registered dietitian on staff, we were able to transform the team’s diet and improve their performance. For example, snacks like candy, crackers, pretzels and fruit snacks have been replaced with natural peanut butter, almond butter, cashews, walnuts, almonds, fresh fruit, yogurt, granola and wholesome snack bars—all foods better suited for the energy expenditure of these athletes.”

How do you balance the high-calorie needs of these athletes while also keeping their diets healthy? LaFata, a board-certified sports dietitian, explains how some of her nutrition secrets keep the U.S. National Team fueled up in the humid weather of Brazil.

Proper hydration. Even the slightest dehydration will impact performance. Playing soccer in Brazil’s hot and humid climate increases fluid needs, and players may require as much as six liters per day. Electrolyte beverages, fruit and vegetable juices and smoothies all contribute to a player’s hydration needs. All contain vital nutrients such as sodium, potassium and magnesium, which are lost in sweating.

Food first. In a sports world of heavy supplementing, the goal of the U.S. National Team is to get their primary fuel from nutrient-rich foods. If needed, supplementation is customized for the individual, but food always comes first. An example of a meal three to four hours prior to a game would include whole-grain pasta with bolognese sauce, chicken breast, grilled asparagus, watermelon and pineapple.

Post-workout eating. To minimize muscle soreness and maximize muscle recovery, post-workout smoothies with the right amount of protein and carbohydrates are given within 30 to 45 minutes after workouts. One post-workout smoothie LaFata makes for the team includes 25 grams of whey protein mixed with water and one and a half bananas.

80/20 principle. Eighty percent of the time, athletes should eat highly nutritious foods including lean proteins, brightly colored fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds and low-fat dairy. For the “other 20 percent,” there is some flexibility on what they eat. This can be 24 to 48 hours after a game or scattered throughout the week. After that, it’s back to healthful eating.

High nutrition with healthy fats. Players reach their high-calorie needs by blasting their diet with a variety of plant-based foods while also adding healthy fats through nuts, seeds, avocadoes and olive oil. The higher the calorie needs, the more generous you can be with healthy fats.

Healing foods for injuries. The United States team has dealt with its share of injuries at the World Cup. For injury recovery, LaFata recommends emphasizing whole-grain foods such as oatmeal, quinoa and wild rice. Other injury recovery foods include fatty fish, green leafy vegetables and legumes.

Visit the Academy’s Food & Nutrition Magazine for a recipe for one of LaFata’s favorite energy-boosting snacks, Peanut Butter Flax Seed Power Bites. And for more information on how a registered dietitian can help improve sports performance, visit www.EatRight.org/SportsNutrition.

LaFata’s headshot is available on the Academy’s website.

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The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

Media contact: Ryan O’Malley, Allison MacMunn
800/877-1600, ext. 4769, 4802

August is Kids Eat Right Month, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and Academy Foundation Announce Children’s Health and Nutrition Education Campaign

FOR RELEASE JUNE 10, 2014


AUGUST IS KIDS EAT RIGHT MONTH
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and Academy Foundation
Announce Children’s Health and Nutrition Education Campaign

CHICAGO – To highlight the role everyone plays in ensuring a healthy future for our nation’s children, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and its Foundation announce the first Kids Eat Right Month, to be celebrated each August.

Kids Eat Right Month will focus on the importance of healthful eating and active lifestyles for children and families, featuring expert advice from registered dietitian nutritionists.

“At a time when the nutritional health of our nation’s children is of peak concern, Kids Eat Right Month will emphasize positive steps families, communities, health care professionals and policy makers can take every day to make sure we are doing all we can to improve children’s health,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy President Sonja Connor.

Kids Eat Right, created in 2010 by the Academy and its charitable Foundation, offers resources and information for Academy members and the public to encourage nutritious, healthful eating among children and families. Kids Eat Right supports efforts of the White House to end the childhood obesity epidemic within a generation.

In celebration of Kids Eat Right Month, registered dietitian nutritionists will mobilize in a grassroots movement, sharing healthful eating messages with schools, communities and faith groups. “As children head back to school in August, Kids Eat Right Month will reinforce our program’s core messages of shopping smart, cooking healthy and eating right,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Foundation Chair Terri Raymond. “By following these principles, we can help ensure children are healthy, succeed in school and grow into healthy adults.”

In addition to educating families on living healthier lifestyles, Kids Eat Right Month will reach out to policy makers whose programs and legislation affect children and their nutritional health.

“Kids Eat Right Month provides RDNs the opportunity to showcase our expertise through the education of children and families as well as urging communities and policy makers to provide children with access to healthy foods at home, in school and at the grocery store,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and the Academy’s National Education Director Katie Brown.

To help celebrate Kids Eat Right Month, the Academy has developed educational materials appropriate for every audience. These free materials will be available in July at www.KidsEatRight.org.

“Raising the next generation of healthy kids starts now,” Connor said. “In August and year-round, the Academy and our Foundation are committed to helping all kids eat right.”

For more information, visit www.KidsEatRight.org.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation is a 501(c)3 charity devoted exclusively to nutrition and dietetics. It funds scholarships and awards, public awareness and research projects and Academy strategic initiatives, and is the largest provider of scholarships and awards in the field of dietetics. Visit the Academy Foundation at www.eatright.org/foundation.


Media contact: Ryan O’Malley, Allison MacMunn
800/877-1600, ext. 4769, 4802
media@eatright.org

No Grilling Regrets: Healthy and Flavorful Grilling Ideas and Techniques From The Home Food Safety Program

FOR RELEASE MAY 13, 2014

No Grilling Regrets: Healthy and Flavorful Grilling Ideas and Techniques From The Home Food Safety Program

CHICAGO – Just in time for grilling season, the Home Food Safety program – a collaboration between the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods – offers healthful grilling advice.

“Grilling with family and friends is a great opportunity to make the most of the summer months, and the latest grilling trend is keeping it healthy – grilling nutritious and flavorful foods with cooking techniques to reduce your risk of food poisoning,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Sarah Krieger.

Food safety at the grill

“Warm weather brings out not only the grills, but also bacteria – which multiply in food faster in warm weather and can cause food poisoning,” Krieger says, offering advice to reduce your risk of food poisoning:

· Wash hands thoroughly before, during and after food preparation. Pack moist towelettes or hand sanitizer for those moments when soap and water are not readily available.

· Scrub your grill with hot, soapy water prior to each use. Removing charred food debris from the grill reduces exposure to bacteria.
Keep raw meats, poultry, seafood and eggs separate from ready-to-eat foods; ditto for the utensils used to handle each. Pack extra color-coded plates and utensils to help prevent cross-contamination. Use different spoons and forks to taste, stir and serve.

 “Marinades can transform the flavor of food, and also tenderize the meat for a more enjoyable meal,” Krieger says. Always marinate foods in the refrigerator, never at room temperature on the counter. Cross-contamination can occur when a marinade is used with raw meat, poultry or fish, then “reused” on cooked foods. So, use a separate brush and utensils for cooked foods and set aside some fresh sauce to use on cooked food.

· Using a food thermometer is the only safe way to determine the doneness of cooked foods.

· To prevent the growth of harmful bacteria, don’t leave food outside in hot weather (90°F or above) for more than one hour. Throw away all perishable foods that have gone unrefrigerated for more than an hour.


How to Grill Safely Video


Fill your grill with healthy options

“Instead of only sticking with traditional hot dogs, hamburgers and sausages – which can be high in fat – mix it up with low-fat options like fish, chicken and vegetables,” Krieger says. “Trust me, you won’t be missing out on flavor. Grilling is a great way to bring out sweet, caramelized flavor in vegetables, and marinades can really bring grilled foods to life.”

Krieger recommends filling half your grill with fruits and vegetables, such as Portobello mushroom burgers and colorful vegetable kabobs with bell peppers, onion pieces, zucchini slices, cherry tomatoes and small mushrooms, or grill pineapple, peaches or nectarines for a naturally sweet dessert.

“Besides adding color and flavor to your cookout, eating plenty of fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet is linked with a reduced risk of some chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes and even some types of cancer,” Krieger says.

Healthful grilling
When proteins in meat, chicken and fish are cooked at searing high temperatures, carcinogenic compounds called heterocyclic amines (or HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs) can naturally form, especially where meat is charred. While research on the health effects isn’t conclusive, the quality of the meat is better if you avoid charring:

· Trim fat and remove skin from meat prior to cooking.

· Emerging research suggests marinating meat for at least 30 minutes can reduce the formation of HCAs.

· Cook foods at a low temperature, and to the outside of the flame rather than directly over it to help prevent flaming. Drain away high-fat marinades and have a spray bottle with water ready for flare-ups.

· Flip food frequently to prevent crusting, and scrape off charred areas before eating meat, poultry or fish.

· Use a food thermometer to determine when food is done, and to avoid overcooking and charring.

“Wow your guests with delicious and healthy foods, prepared safely, so you won’t end up with any grilling regrets,” Krieger says.

To learn more about safe and flavorful grilling, including marinating foods, grilling with wood chips and to download the Safe Grilling Guide and more, visit www.HomeFoodSafety.org and download the free Is My Food Safe? app.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods’ Home Food Safety program is dedicated to raising consumer awareness about the seriousness of food poisoning and providing solutions for easily and safely handling food in their own kitchens. More information can be found at www.HomeFoodSafety.org.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.


Media contact: Ryan O’Malley, Allison MacMunn
800/877-1600, ext. 4769, 4802
media@eatright.org


As Advocates For Improvements on Food Labels, Academy of Nutrition And Dietetics Supports FDA’s Proposed Label Changes, Calls for Nutrition Education for Consumers

For Release February 27, 2014

CHICAGO – Changes announced today to the Nutrition Facts label found on most foods sold in stores represent a significant step forward in helping people understand the label, and connect the label more closely to consumers’ actual behavior, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

“Today is a big win for consumers,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy President Dr. Glenna McCollum. “The changes announced today are long overdue. There has been so much new research about consumers’ use of food labels, chronic diseases like obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease and how specific nutrients affect our health.

“Meanwhile, the Nutrition Facts Panel is more than 20 years old and does not reflect the current food environment or recent scientific research. Consumers want information they can use to make healthful choices. And new research on consumers’ use of the label, eating patterns, nutrition science and chronic diseases needs to be reflected on the label,” McCollum said. “It was time for a change, and today the FDA is making progress in the right direction.”

The FDA’s announcement comes nearly 20 years after the nutrition facts panel was first introduced. Since the FDA indicated it would be making revisions, the Academy has been actively encouraging the agency to update the label to reflect the best science about the current food and disease environment. The most significant modifications to the label reflect the Academy’s evidence-based recommendations for promoting healthful eating, and align with its Food Labeling Principles, McCollum said.

“The new changes are based on science, and they take people’s actual eating behavior into account. Serving sizes for many products have been updated to realistically reflect the amounts people actually eat at one sitting, nutrient comparisons between ‘per serving’ and ‘per container’ are available, and a new requirement will tell consumers how much sugar is being added to a product,” McCollum said.

“In general, the new panel connects the expert recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to real life. With the new panel, consumers will be able to determine if a particular product in the grocery store meets the Dietary Guidelines,” McCollum said.

“But there is more work to be done. Despite the improvements announced today, many Americans are not familiar with how to use the information on the existing Nutrition Facts panel. To make these changes fully meaningful for consumers, the Academy recommends implementing a sustained, adequately funded nutrition education initiative empowering consumers to use the new label to make informed decisions to eat healthfully,” McCollum said.

Examples include helping people learn how to read and understand concepts like “percent daily value” or “added sugars,” she said.

“The Nutrition Facts panel is only one source of information, which is why sustained support for educational programs and individual counseling by registered dietitian nutritionists is essential,” McCollum said. “Registered dietitian nutritionists are the most qualified health professionals to provide the nutrition education people need, and to help them choose healthy foods to improve their health. RDNs are ready to help consumers use the new label as a tool to make healthier choices in the store, at home and when eating out.”

The Academy will continue to work with the FDA on future initiatives, including the possibility of Front of Package labeling and the sorts of health claims and structure or function claims that can be made about foods.

“At its core, the label must be truthful and not misleading. Content on the label should help consumers make informed decisions to build a healthy diet. We must continue to work on making all labels clear and understandable to consumers to improve the nation’s health,” McCollum said.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.

Prepare Flavorful Foods With Food Safety In Mind: Home Food Safety Tips For National Nutrition Month

For Release February 25, 2014

Prepare Flavorful Foods With Food Safety In Mind: Home Food Safety Tips For National Nutrition Month

CHICAGO – Proper preparation, cooking and storage can keep foods safe while maintaining their flavor and nutrients. For National Nutrition Month® and its 2014 theme “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right,” the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ and ConAgra Foods’ Home Food Safety program offers ways to get the most flavor out of foods while reducing the risk of food poisoning.

“Taste is typically what we have in mind when we prepare food, but it’s also important to consider how we’re preparing foods and how this could affect food safety,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy spokesperson Bethany Thayer. “Each year, 48 million Americans are sickened by food poisoning. By following a few simple steps, you can reduce your risk while enjoying the flavorful, nutritious foods you love.”

The Home Food Safety program is dedicated to raising awareness about food poisoning and helping Americans easily and safely handle food at home. Thayer’s tips include:

Preparing Foods with Nutrition, Flavor and Safety in Mind

“Properly handling and preparing food is key to food safety, and can also affect the quality of foods,” Thayer said.

· Whether they are organic or conventionally grown, wash all fresh fruits and vegetables with cool tap water. Avoid soaking fruits and vegetables as you wash because some nutrients dissolve in water.

· Leave edible skins on vegetables and fruits such as carrots, potatoes or pears, and trim away as little skin as possible. Most vitamins and minerals are found in the outer leaves, skin and areas just below the skin, not in the center. Peels also are natural barriers that help protect against nutrient loss.

· Cut vegetables that need to be cooked longer into larger pieces. With fewer surfaces exposed, fewer vitamins are lost.

Cooking for Nutrition, Flavor and Safety

“How food is cooked can enhance or destroy flavor. Get the most flavor and nutrition out of your food, while also reducing the risk of food poisoning,” Thayer said.

· Overcooking meat can detract from its flavor. Use a food thermometer to determine when meat has reached a safe minimum internal temperature and to prevent overcooking. Cooking foods to a safe temperature is the only reliable way to determine the doneness of cooked meats, poultry, egg dishes and leftovers.

· Cook vegetables or fruits in a small amount of water, or steam them in a vegetable steamer, covered pot or a microwave oven. Steaming retains nutrients and there’s a flavor advantage, too: Unless they are overcooked, vegetables retain the color and tender-crisp qualities that make them appealing.

Storing Foods for Safety and Flavor

“Poor storage destroys flavor and quality, while storing food correctly helps keep nutrient loss to a minimum and flavor and food quality at their peak,” Thayer said.

· Keep your refrigerator at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below to slow bacteria growth that spoils food and ruins flavor.

· Store opened packages of dry foods, such as rice and pasta, in dry, airtight containers. This will keep out insects and rodents and keep food from obtaining odors.

· Leave food in its original wrapping unless the package is torn. If you have to rewrap, seal storage containers well to prevent moisture loss and absorption of other odors. Wrapping raw meat, poultry and fish in separate plastic bags also keeps raw meat juices from contaminating other foods.

· When freezing, pack food items in freezer bags or airtight containers. Squeeze air from bags before sealing and leave some space in containers in case foods expand. If moisture escapes, frozen food can become dry, tough and tasteless and may develop freezer burn.


For more food safety tips, visit the award-winning www.HomeFoodSafety.org and download the free Is My Food Safe? app for Apple and Android devices.

Learn more about National Nutrition Month and how you can “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right” at www.EatRight.org/NNM.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy's Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use "registered dietitian nutritionist" (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods’ Home Food Safety program is dedicated to raising consumer awareness about the seriousness of food poisoning and providing solutions for easily and safely handling food in their own kitchens. More information can be found at www.HomeFoodSafety.org.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Applauds Passage Of Farm Bill, Measures To Support Access To Healthy Foods For Millions

FOR RELEASE FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Applauds Passage Of Farm Bill, Measures To Support Access To Healthy Foods For Millions

CHICAGO – The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics applauds Congress for passing the Agriculture Act of 2014, a bill commonly referred to as the Farm Bill. The Academy supports this piece of legislation that protects vital nutrition assistance and education programs; includes new initiatives that will improve the health of the nation; and enhances funding for nutrition and agriculture research.

“The American people deserve a Farm Bill because it has a major impact on the entire nation’s food system, and we are pleased to see one move through Congress,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics President Dr. Glenna McCollum. “Included in this especially important and massive piece of legislation are nutrition programs that provide access to healthy foods for millions,” she said.

“The Academy has been actively involved in the reauthorization of the Farm Bill for the last two years by engaging our members to send thousands of letters to Congress, encouraging constituents to meet with their legislators and working with our partners to garner support for nutrition programs and offer new ideas for cost effective solutions,” McCollum said.

Most recently, the Academy focused its efforts on protecting the SNAP nutrition education program. SNAP-Ed is vital to helping families utilize limited resources to purchase healthy foods and engage in a physically active lifestyle.

“We are grateful that SNAP-Ed is protected so that we can continue providing low-income Americans with the tools necessary to lead healthy lives on a limited budget,” McCollum said.

“As an organization committed to reducing food insecurity and hunger, we are pleased to see that the final bill does not include drastic cuts to SNAP like those that were proposed in the original House version. However, we do recognize that some families will be affected by the reduction of benefits,” McCollum said.

The final bill takes measures to enhance SNAP, including increasing access to homebound seniors or disabled participants by allowing home delivery of foods purchased with SNAP benefits; increasing stocking requirements for SNAP retailers to include more variety; and providing investments to improve access to and reduce the cost of fruits and vegetables for SNAP recipients.

One of the Academy’s top priorities is food and agriculture research, which also provides policy makers with the critical information they need to make decisions about the health of our food system. Funding for ongoing nutrition and agriculture research was maintained in the Farm Bill and new resources were allocated to food and agriculture research designed to support the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s research activities.

“As a science-based organization, we support the funding of these research programs and look forward to leveraging their outcomes to benefit the nation,” McCollum said. “The Academy will continue to pay close attention to this bill as it is implemented through regulations that support access to healthy foods, enhance nutrition agriculture research and ensure programs are efficient and effective.”

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.




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