During Men’s Health Month
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Remind Men To Eat Right For Every Decade Of Life


CHICAGO – Gentlemen, do you think your nutrition needs stay the same your whole adult life? Every decade has its own health concerns, from weight creep to heart disease, all which change the types and amounts of food you need to eat during each life stage. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages men to take time during Men’s Health Month to ensure they have developed a healthful eating plan that is most appropriate and beneficial for their age.

“Each life stage has its own nutritional requirements to keep your body running in peak form,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Jim White. “Eating right at every age will help you sail through the decades feeling great.”

The Academy and its expert registered dietitian nutritionists offer tips to help men understand which foods will help boost their health at every decade of life.




20s: High Energy
“A higher metabolism and an active lifestyle can help younger men maintain a better weight, even if their diet isn’t stellar,” White says. “Eating foods like nuts, seeds and dried fruit instead of snacks like chips, soda and candy can satisfy your hunger and give a nutrient boost at the same time.”

Active guys need to be sure they're getting enough protein. Choose a variety of foods like seafood, lean meat and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts and seeds. “Heart-healthy fatty fish like salmon, tuna and mackerel can reduce the risk of developing heart disease, too,” White says.

30s: Weight Doesn't Wait
“While your appetite may stay the same in your 30s as in your 20s, your lifestyle has likely slowed a little due to marriage, kids and jobs. So now is the time to change to a more regular eating pattern,” White says.

Eating smaller, more regular and more frequent meals throughout the day will help you keep from getting too hungry and then overeating at a meal later in the day. “Plan healthy meals and snacks for your day, whether you’re at work or at home,” White says.

40s: Feed the Heart and Bones
As men age, the risk of heart disease becomes greater, and your 40s are the time to put more focus on heart health. “Fiber, especially soluble fiber found in peas, beans, oats, apples and citrus fruit, can help keep your heart healthy because it works like a sponge to soak up cholesterol,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Ximena Jimenez.

Now is also a good time reinforce strong teeth and bones. “Calcium from low-fat or fat-free dairy, dark green leafy vegetables or tofu, and vitamin D from fortified foods like milk and cereal are two of the best nutrients for your bones and teeth,” Jimenez says. 

50s: Busting Disease
As certain diseases like cancer, especially prostate cancer, become more likely in the 50s and beyond, including plenty of antioxidants in your diet is key, like those found in berries and colorful vegetables.
While lycopene, vitamin E and selenium are marketed to men as tools to reduce the chance of developing prostate cancer, there is no definitive science to back up these claims. “Whether there is a direct correlation between prostate cancer and these minerals or not, an overall healthy diet should contain both selenium and lycopene,” White says.

60s and Beyond: Maintain the Muscle
In your 60s and beyond, men start losing muscle mass, so protein is important. Replace protein foods that are higher in solid fats with choices that are lower in solid fats and calories or are sources of oils, such as salmon and tuna. “Also look at beans and peas. Because of their high nutrient content, they are considered both a vegetable and a protein food,” White says.

For more information on men’s health, visit www.EatRight.org/MensHealth.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

Report From Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics Foundation Focuses On Benefits Of Reducing Food Waste: Economic, Environmental and Social

CHICAGO – More than one-third of food produced in the United States goes uneaten – contributing to problems ranging from hunger and malnutrition to environmental and economic concerns. Registered dietitian nutritionists are uniquely qualified to help reduce food loss and waste by individuals, families, communities, business and industry, according to a new report funded by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation.

The report, “The State of America’s Wasted Food & Opportunities to Make a Difference” is available on the Academy Foundation’s website. A version of the report is also available on the website of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in advance of publication in the printed Journal later this year.

In a foreword to the report, the Academy’s President, registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Evelyn F. Crayton, writes: “From the farm through the production and distribution process to the grocery store to the home – wherever there is food, there is unfortunately food waste. As Academy members, we have no higher duty than to help everyone create and maintain their nutritional health. This includes wise production strategies and a commitment to conservation that minimizes wasted food.”

The report was written by registered dietitian nutritionists Chris Vogliano, agriculture, health and nutrition research fellow at the Academy; and Katie Brown, the Academy Foundation’s chief global nutrition strategy officer. The report details how and where wasted food occurs in the United States, “along the entire food supply chain, from farms, processors, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, restaurants/foodservice establishments and consumers – and everywhere in between.”

The report spotlights five Academy members, from a variety of geographic and practice areas, who are active in efforts to decrease food waste:
·         Janice Giddens, nutrition and wellness program manager at the Atlanta Community Food Bank, and her colleagues distribute more than 60 million pounds of food and grocery products while educating staff, partner agencies and clients to understand and optimize “best by” and “use by” dates and , increase the amounts of healthy foods that are distributed.
·         Barbara Hartman, chief of nutrition and foodservice at Martinsburg VA Medical Center, in West Virginia, and her staff are decreasing food waste by donating wholesome leftovers to a nonprofit agency and composting unavoidable waste at on-site gardens.
·         Alice Henneman, nutrition educator at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln Extension, teaches clients how to reduce food waste in their own homes with food shopping, storage, cooking and composting tips and techniques.
·         Donna S. Martin, director of the Burke County, Ga., school nutrition program, has implemented programs that cut back on food waste by offering students more options to choose foods they like and scheduling longer lunch periods to provide enough time for students to eat.
·         Janell Walker, director of nutrition and community outreach at DC Central Kitchen in Washington, D.C., and her staff recover leftover food and converts it into meals for hungry and at-risk community residents; and works with neighborhood stores to increase availability of fresh produce in “food deserts” and repurpose “unsellable” produce into healthy meals.

The report’s authors conclude: “There is an immense need to shift our culture’s mindset towards one of conservation, especially American consumers, as we produce the largest amount of wasted food. The good news is that reducing wasted food makes sense – economically, environmentally and socially. Making any change towards a reduction of wasted food is a commendable step in the right direction.”

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The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation is a 501(c)3 charity devoted exclusively to nutrition and dietetics. It funds scholarships and awards, public awareness and research projects and Academy strategic initiatives, and is the largest provider of scholarships and awards in the field of dietetics. The Foundation’s mission is advancing public health and nutrition utilizing the expertise of registered dietitians. Visit the Academy Foundation at www.eatrightfoundation.org

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics urges Congress: Pass Preventing Diabetes in Medicare Act



FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 11, 2015

CHICAGO - During November’s American Diabetes Month, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics joins advocacy communities across the country to raise awareness of the fact that diabetes rates have continued to rise over the past 10 years. To help save lives, improve health and save countless health care dollars, the Academy urges Congress to pass legislation that would provide effective and comprehensive medical nutrition therapy to Medicare beneficiaries with prediabetes.

”Nearly 10 percent of the U.S. population has diabetes,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy President Evelyn Crayton. “Unfortunately, there is even more reason to be concerned. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes, which is a state of being at extremely high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. While a diagnosis of prediabetes may seem hopeless, there are proven interventions to prevent and delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes.”

Senators Susan Collins (Maine) and Jeanne Shaheen (N.H.) and Congressmen Diana DeGette (Colo), Tim Ryan (Ohio) and Ed Whitfield (Ky) have introduced resolutions in both chambers of Congress to raise awareness about the prevalence of diabetes and to promote the need for additional research and preventative efforts to fight this debilitating disease.

One of the most successful diabetes interventions is medical nutrition therapy, or MNT. This effective and comprehensive treatment is an evidence-based service performed by registered dietitian nutritionists for disease management, such as delaying and even preventing the onset of Type 2 diabetes. Numerous studies support the effectiveness of MNT, showing recipients losing weight and improving blood glucose levels.

The use of MNT as an intervention is strongly supported by research and professional organizations. Studies indicate that people who consult with registered dietitian nutritionists and diabetes educators have improved diabetes outcomes and quality of life.

“However, while Medicare covers MNT for individuals with diabetes, it does not cover MNT for individuals with prediabetes,” Crayton said. “Without this coverage, many of those with prediabetes are unable to afford services to treat and manage their disease.”

The Preventing Diabetes in Medicare Act (H.R. 1686), being debated in Congress, would allow Medicare beneficiaries to receive MNT coverage for prediabetes, helping millions of Americans receive the services they need and preventing a massive increase in the number of people with Type 2 diabetes.

The Academy, along with partners in the Diabetes Advocacy Alliance, have asked Congress to hold a hearing on diabetes during American Diabetes Month, which would elevate interest in and visibility of diabetes legislation and allow legislation, such as the Preventing Diabetes in Medicare Act, to move forward and improve the detection, prevention and treatment of diabetes.

“While Congress waits, millions of Americans continue to struggle,” Crayton said. “The Academy urges Congress: Pass H.R. 1686.”

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The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.
FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 27, 2015

ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS RESPONDS TO 
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION’S FINDINGS ON 
MEAT CONSUMPTION AND CANCER LINK

CHICAGO – The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals, released the following statement today in response to the World Health Organization’s recent findings that consumption of red meat and processed meat can increase cancer risks:
In light of the recent findings by the World Health Organization classifying the consumption of red meat as probably carcinogenic to humans and the consumption of processed meats as carcinogenic to humans, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends consumers in the United States vary their daily protein choices by including lean meats, poultry and fish along with plants sources like beans, legumes, nuts and seeds. Consumption of processed meats like ham, bacon and hot dogs, which are often high in saturated fat and sodium, should be limited.

The Academy strives to communicate healthy eating messages that emphasize a balance of food and beverages within energy needs, rather than any one food or meal. According to the Academy’s Total Diet Approach to Healthy Eating position paper, when too much emphasis is given to a single food or food component, confusion and controversy can hinder, rather than facilitate, consumers’ ability to adopt healthy dietary patterns.

Anyone who is concerned about how red meat can be included into a healthy eating plan should consult a registered dietitian nutritionist. Visit www.eatright.org to learn more.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.

Celebrate National Food Safety Education Month with Advice From the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


CHICAGO – September is National Food Safety Education Month and the perfect time to teach consumers the importance of food safety and reducing the risk of food poisoning. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics urges everyone to take time during September to reinforce proper food safety practices in their homes.

Each year in the United States, about 48 million people get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die from foodborne disease.  However, many people don’t recognize the serious nature of food poisoning and often confuse symptoms with those of the common flu. “Food poisoning is a legitimate concern and it is essential that everyone understands the risk and learns proper food safety practices,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Torey Armul.

Food Safety Education Is Key

Reducing food poisoning by just 1 percent would keep approximately half a million Americans from getting sick each year. One of the best ways to reduce the risk of food poisoning is to educate consumers on proper food safety practices that they can implement in their homes.

“Many people assume restaurant meals are a cause of food poisoning, but in reality one-third of all food poisoning cases are caused by food prepared at home,” Armul says. “Keeping food safe is critical, whether cooking a holiday feast or reheating leftovers.”

A University of California-Davis consumer research study revealed that many consumers overlook safe food preparation practices in their homes. According to the study, 65 percent of participants did not wash their hands before starting meal preparation and 40 percent of participants undercooked their chicken.

“Education is just the first step,” Armul says. “Making those food safety practices part of the food preparation routine is next.”

Resources Are Available

Food safety education is critical - that is why the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has partnered with ConAgra Foods to develop the Home Food Safety program. Through this program, the Academy offers a library of free resources on www.HomeFoodSafety.org. The website includes articles, downloadable guides, how-to videos, educational infographics and much more.

For food safety information on-the-go, the Home Food Safety program also offers the free Is My Food Safe? mobile app. This app includes a food storage guide, a complete list of proper internal cooking temperatures and a food safety quiz to test your knowledge.

During September and beyond, take time to remember the importance of food safety.

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The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Commends Strong, Evidence-Based Dietary Guidelines Report

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals, commends the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee for drafting a strong, evidence-based Scientific Report outlining recommendations and rational for the forthcoming 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The Academy supports these recommendations that will improve how and what Americans eat.

“The Academy applauds the evidence-based systematic review of the literature, which is vital to the DGAC’s assessment of the science,” said registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy President Sonja L. Connor. “We commend the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture for their commitment to the Nutrition Evidence Library and their ongoing efforts to strengthen the evidence-based approach for assessing the scientific literature for future dietary recommendations.”

In comments recently submitted to USDA and HHS, the Academy supports the DGAC in its decision to drop dietary cholesterol from the nutrients of concern list and recommends it deemphasize saturated fat from nutrients of concern, given the lack of evidence connecting it with cardiovascular disease.

“Despite some criticism suggesting that changed recommendations illustrate concerns about the validity of the nutrition science upon which the Dietary Guidelines are based, the DGAC should change its recommendations to be consistent with the best available science and to abide by its statutory mandate,” Connor said.

The Academy also expresses concern over blanket sodium restriction recommendations in light of recent evidence of potential harm to the overall population. “There is a distinct and growing lack of scientific consensus on making a single sodium consumption recommendation for all Americans, owing to a growing body of research suggesting that the low sodium intake levels recommended by the DGAC are actually associated with increased mortality for healthy individuals,” Connor said.

The Academy supports an increased focus on reduction of added sugars as a key public health concern. “Among the identified cross-cutting issues, the evidence is strongest that a reduction in the intake of added sugars will improve the health of the American public. The identification and recognition of the specific health risks posed by added sugars represents an important step forward for public health,” Connor said.

In its comments, Academy also emphasizes that enhanced nutrition education is imperative to any effective implementation. “It is critical to ensure that individuals making diet and behavior changes in accordance with the Dietary Guidelines have access to the resources and support necessary to succeed. HHS and USDA must have sufficient resources to commit to improving a number of initiatives,” Connor said.

“The Academy appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Scientific Report and to serve as a resource to HHS and USDA as they finalize the 2015 Dietary Guidelines and develop resources to implement and promote their use,” Connor said.

The final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans are expected to be released at the end of this year.

‘Bite Into A Healthy Lifestyle’ With Informed Food Choices During National Nutrition Month® And Beyond, Says Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics

FOR RELEASE JANUARY 27, 2015


CHICAGO – An eating pattern that meets people’s nutrient needs within calorie limits is vital to maintaining good health and quality of life. That’s why the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is encouraging everyone to “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle” with informed food choices during National Nutrition Month® 2015 and throughout the year.

“A healthy lifestyle is about so much more than just choosing to eat more fruits and vegetables. While that is important, it’s also essential to make informed food choices based on your individual health and nutrient needs,” says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Marjorie Nolan Cohn. “Knowing which nutrients your body needs, the foods that contain them, and how much fits into your healthy eating plan are all part of making smart choices.”

Each March, the Academy encourages Americans to return to the basics of healthy eating through National Nutrition Month®. This year’s theme encourages consumers to adopt a healthy lifestyle that is focused on consuming fewer calories, making informed food choices and getting daily exercise in order to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, reduce the risk of chronic disease and promote overall health.

Learn your needs
Age, gender, body type, family history, existing health conditions and daily routines all play a factor in determining which foods we should eat more of and which we should avoid when trying to optimize our health.

“A consultation with a registered dietitian nutritionist is the best tool for learning what your body needs to achieve peak health and prevent disease,” Cohn says. “An RDN will review your health history, and then work with your preferences and routine to put together a comprehensive and achievable lifestyle-based eating plan.”

Find your foods
Understanding what is in food is essential to making informed food choices while building an eating plan that meets your tastes.

“This may sound simple, but knowing which foods contain the nutrients you need is the next step in biting into a healthy lifestyle,” Cohn says. “For instance, most people know that oranges are a good source of vitamin C, but so are tomatoes and potatoes. Dairy foods like milk are a good source of calcium, but so is broccoli. Fruits and vegetables provide fiber, but so do whole grains and beans. A registered dietitian nutritionist can guide your food choices while keeping your tastes and preferences in mind.”

Know the facts
When food selections go beyond whole foods and into packaged foods, understanding what fits and what doesn’t may not be as clear.

“Front-of-package nutrition claims, ingredient lists and Nutrition Facts Panels can make any food choice dizzying, but with a few tips from an RDN, that task will be less daunting,” Cohn says.

“The higher an ingredient is on the list, the more of that ingredient is included compared to the others. This is a good way to determine if a particular food product is made with whole grains or has a lot of added sugar,” Cohn says.

“Often when an ingredient like salt or fat is reduced, more of another ingredient is added to help keep taste consistent,” Cohn says. “So, no matter what the claim is on the front of the package, it’s important to always read the Nutrition Facts Panel to determine how many calories and how much fat, sugar and salt a are in the package.”

Making the right food and nutrition choices is a necessary part of biting into a healthy lifestyle. A registered dietitian nutritionist can help. To learn more and to find an RDN in your area visit www.eatright.org.

As part of this public education campaign, the Academy’s National Nutrition Month website includes a variety of helpful tips, games, promotional tools and nutrition education resources, all designed to spread the message of good nutrition based on the “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle” theme.

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All registered dietitians are nutritionists – but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The Academy’s Board of Directors and Commission on Dietetic Registration have determined that those who hold the credential registered dietitian (RD) may optionally use “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN) instead. The two credentials have identical meanings.


The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. Visit the Academy at www.eatright.org

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